The second season, the season of maturity, is characterized by less neural flux and by greater stability of brain structures. This is the age of productive activity, when the emphasis gradually shifts from learning about the world to contributing to and molding the world around us through our individual professional and vocational activities. This is the most extensively studied season of the mind and of the brain. In fact, until a few decades ago our knowledge was limited to this stage. The standard texts of neuroanatomy, neurology, or neuropsychology, as well as dozens of books written for the general public, are mostly about this stage, so there is no point in restating much of this normative knowledge here. Suffice it to say, in our zeal for generalizations we have been treating the mature brain in rather generic terms. This is undoubtedly a useful enterprise, and a reasonable point of departure for any scientific inquiry, but only to a point. While perusing any standard text, you are not likely to encounter any reference to the gender differences in brain organization, let alone to the individual differences. But such differences do exist and we are only now beginning to understand them. From the aerial view of all humanity represented by a composite, we are gradually moving to the understanding of the neural foundations of individuality.
*7\302\2*

SEASONS OF THE BRAIN: MATURE BRAINThe second season, the season of maturity, is characterized by less neural flux and by greater stability of brain structures. This is the age of productive activity, when the emphasis gradually shifts from learning about the world to contributing to and molding the world around us through our individual professional and vocational activities. This is the most extensively studied season of the mind and of the brain. In fact, until a few decades ago our knowledge was limited to this stage. The standard texts of neuroanatomy, neurology, or neuropsychology, as well as dozens of books written for the general public, are mostly about this stage, so there is no point in restating much of this normative knowledge here. Suffice it to say, in our zeal for generalizations we have been treating the mature brain in rather generic terms. This is undoubtedly a useful enterprise, and a reasonable point of departure for any scientific inquiry, but only to a point. While perusing any standard text, you are not likely to encounter any reference to the gender differences in brain organization, let alone to the individual differences. But such differences do exist and we are only now beginning to understand them. From the aerial view of all humanity represented by a composite, we are gradually moving to the understanding of the neural foundations of individuality.*7\302\2*

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks

Random Posts