Women confront new sexual issues at menopause. The most obvious is that you have physical evidence that you can no longer get pregnant. The relief from having to deal with contraception or worry about periods can mean a new found freedom of sexual expression. Jane recalls, T never realized how much contraception interfered with our sex life. I hated being on the Pill, I couldn’t use an IUD because my periods got so heavy, Bob just refused to use condoms, so it was up to me to use a diaphragm. I found that a real bore too after a few years, so it got to the stage where I’d figure out exactly where ‘I was in my cycle before I’d decide whether I could be bothered messing around with spermicides and things. Once I knew I was past all that, we went through a real sort of renaissance in our sex life. It was like starting again except we were much more experienced. The kids had all left home and we started doing things we hadn’t dared do before. We were both much more spontaneous.’

Just as aging brings about physical changes in men that alter their sexual function, so women also undergo a natural process of change after menopause. Your vaginal tissue becomes thinner and drier but being dry doesn’t mean you are not as sexually aroused. The dryness can cause some pain with intercourse if you don’t find an alternative way of lubricating (like lubricating gel or saliva). As the labia (lips around the vulva) shrink in size, the clitoris becomes more exposed and it loses some of its sensitivity. Many of these difficulties can be solved by hormone replacement therapy. We are used to hearing about the value of pelvic floor exercises to tone up the muscles around the vagina and urinary outlet (urethra) for women having babies. These exercises are worth learning in your teens and continuing right through life. In older age groups they have been shown to increase the blood flow around the vagina (improving lubrication), increase the vaginal muscle tone (which can enhance orgasm) and help to prevent the common problem of incontinence.

After menopause, a woman’s orgasm is different too. As well as the slower clitoral response, the muscle contractions of orgasm are not as strong. In spite of these changes, a woman’s need for affection and physical closeness continues.

*150/17/9*

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks

Related Posts: